Six from Johns Hopkins BME elected to AIMBE College of Fellows

Six members of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University have been elected to the College of Fellows at the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

The six faculty members include:

Joel Bader, professor of Biomedical Engineering, was recognized “for outstanding contributions to systems biology of human disease, computational biology, and synthetic biology.”

Jordan Green, associate professor of Biomedical Engineering, was honored “for outstanding contributions to bioengineering, including innovations in nanobiotechnology, biomimetic materials, and cellular engineering.

Rachel Karchin, associate professor of Biomedical Engineering, was nominated “for outstanding contributions to translational bioinformatics and computational molecular precision medicine.”

Steven Salzberg, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, and Biostatistics, was recognized “for outstanding contributions to computational genomics, including pioneering methods for gene finding, whole-genome assembly, and analysis of next-generation sequencing data.”

Reza Shadmehr, professor of Biomedical Engineering, was recognized “for outstanding contributions to the question of how the brain learns to predict and control the physics of our movements.”

Leslie Tung, professor and Interim Director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, was recognized “for outstanding contributions to the study of cardiac function and arrhythmias using experimental in-vitro and theoretical mathematical models.”

The College of Fellows comprises 1,500 medical and biological engineers in academia, industry, and government who have distinguished themselves through their contributions in research, industrial practice, or education. Fellows are considered “the life-blood of AIMBE and work towards realizing AIMBE’s vision to provide medical and biological engineering innovation for the benefit of humanity.”

“It is a great honor for one to be elected to the AIMBE College of Fellows, which requires that they be in the top 2% of the medical and biological engineering community. I am proud of the success each of our faculty members have achieved, and I am privileged to be a part of such an outstanding department,” says Tung.